SOME THEMES Home    
 
  SURREALISM GOTHIC SYDNEY URBAN FORM
FORK & CUBE
FRACTAL COAST    
  Photography conveys a
strong illusion of reality
and the rational. These
images move a step further, from the conscious towards
the unconscious and the irrational, escaping to the magic of the surreal. But the dream-state can switch from amusing to terrifying in an instant... This series is inspired by the greats -- Dali, Magritte, Dorothea Tanning, Man Ray and their peers, a way of seeing applied here through
present-day objects and locations composed with present-day digital tools.

Sydney's Gothic towers, its famous fruit bats, its black
crows, its graveyards and its dramatic skies provide a
dark and romantic counterfoil
to the soullessness all-too-often imposed by government
and corporate functionaries.
A study of the structures underlying human-built vs natural forms and how they
relate in the urban context.
We essentially build cubes
while nature grows in fractal patterns, notably the fork structure of trees. These unreconstructed photographs juxtapose the two, often in a decontextualised frame to
imply a one-on-one relationship, personifying each element and thereby commenting on the human condition. Cubes and their variations earn rent and therefore dominate. Forks don't. Yet when buildings decay, the
cracks in the edifice branch
in a remarkably tree-like way.
On another level this black-and-white series documents today's Sydney and its architecture in unexpected ways, revealing novel aspects and distilling
the remarkable from
the everyday.
Girt by sea, Australia has spawned a wealth of littoral imagery in all branches of the arts. This series explores the Implacable elemental forces
that produce intricate fractal edges. Many of these images replace water with fire,
recalling the volcanic origins
of our coastline and hinting
at the global warming again
on the geological agenda.
The removal of evidence of organic life recalls the fiery origins of our planet, a simplification that better showcases the beauty
of its form while warning
us that there are no
guarantees of survival.
   

Other themes include an extensive photo archive of the Kings Cross area covering the past seven years;

portraiture; graffiti and street art; landscape photography; travel photography; and news photography.